Archive for the ‘rear-sets’ Tag

1978 Honda CB550 Cafe Racer

I’ve written about the Benjie’s Cafe Racer shop a couple of times before, so it’s nice to see a bike using BCR parts floating around on the web. This particular machine is up for auction on eBay.

The CB550 is quite a nice bike as is. But this has been built up to really look the part of a cafe racer. The BCR tank and seat are what really make this bike shine. It does need two things, though: move the bars to a better position (they appear to be mounted upside-down (do clubmans come flat or with a small amount of downward angle?) and then rotated upwards), and put some rear-sets on that thing. Then this would be a top-notch cafe racer…


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2002 Harley-Davidson Sportster 1200 Cafe Racer

As you may or may not know, I like Sportsters. I have 2005 883 myself, and have been converting it into a cafe racer for the last two years. Cafe conversions of the XL are fairly few and fair between relatively speaking, so when one comes up for sale on eBay, or I find one elsewhere, it tends to end up posted on the blog.

What we have here is a 2002 XL 1200. What does buying a 1200 and not an 883 get you? About 20 extra horsepower and dual front discs. While this bike has some nice mods done to it, it is far from complete. The clip-ons are there. The fender has been bobbed nicely. The bike has the black-out treatment on lots of the parts.

So what’s left?

It’s got to have a new exhaust. I don’t even want to think about how loud the stock head pipes run without mufflers must be. and it probably has moved the power band completely to the top end. I’m going to guess that the carb has been set up properly given that the bike has cams and head-work done to it. Oh yeah, did I mention how loud it probably is?

The wheels: stock Harley wheels are heavy! It needs something lighter. Sportsters can be made relatively light compared to their portly weight in stock form, but one of the most important weight-loss procedures is losing the factory boat-anchors. Plus, Sportsters with 18″ 40-spoke alloy rims built up on nice, stock alloy hubs look really sweet!

Three sets of foot pegs: it’s got three! Pick any two and get on with it. Rear-sets would be best, but lose the highway pegs if nothing else.

That’s it. I’m done complaining. This is a good build-up of a Sportster into an almost cafe racer. A couple of tweeks, and it would be done. And I bet it’s a lot faster than a lot of bikes out on the road…


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Honda CB350F Cafe Racer

Here is a fairly standard build of a CB350 four-cylinder cafe racer. The seat goes well with the tank, it’s got reasonably sticky tires, clubman bars are fitted, and the pipe is a nicely upswept 4-into-1 piece of kit that has been blacked out.

But… it is still running standard position foot pegs. And it has the all-to-familiar flat black paint job.

Additionally, the seller is also selling a much more interesting Kawasaki drag bike, but the spelling in that listing looks like an offshore scammer trying to dump a stock-photo slathered GSXR1000. Weird, because this listing was written reasonably well by eBay standards.

Either bike from this seller is a decent buy if you can get past any trepidations you might have at the possible scammy implications of the writing in the drag bike listing. And I will admit that a nice revvy CB350F might be just the bike for me…


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Honda CB650 Cafe Racer Project

For your wintertime enjoyment, here’s a project to keep you occupied for the next several months as you wait for the snowy/rainy season to end. It’s missing a few parts for completion, but is mostly there. And the important cafe bits are there (tank, clip-ons, pseudo-cafe-racer seat), so it’s more about picking out rear-sets and finding a battery for the bike. Plus it needs some major clean-up. It would be interesting to see how this bike could turn out…


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2001 Harley-Davidson Sportster Cafe Racer

I am really torn by bikes like this. Converting a Sportster into a cafe racer is kind of a daunting process. There aren’t a lot of sources for true cafe-styled parts for these bike (especially 2004+ rubber-mount bikes), and when you tell the parts guy at your local shop what you are doing, most likely he or she will give you a blank stare.

So if you do manage to find the parts, then you have to do a good job with the conversion. With this particular bike, it is certainly beautiful, and has a number of really nice parts attached to it: Storz rear-sets, nice race-style seat, beautiful H-D themed paint, and a great intake/exhaust combo. But a well-built cafe racer is more than a simple sum of its parts.

In this case, I am concerned that the bike looks lowered front and rear. For my personal Sportster cafe racer, I actually raised the bike 1″ in the front and 2″ in the rear to try for more ground clearance. And I don’t really want to be careening through corners while trying to maintain a grip on the shiny bits at the end of these drag bars. Cafe racers typically have a form-follows-function aesthetic, while this bike is trying to go both ways. Like Storz rear-sets on a lowered bike.

Now, if I could bolt my 15″ shocks to this bike, add my clip-ons, and put some stiff Race-Tech springs in the front end, this would be a great bike…


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Polished Aluminum Cafe Racer Tank

I think I have posted before that the tank can make or break the look of a cafe racer. It is the biggest problem with my Sportster. The peanut tank is, well, a peanut tank. True/pure cafe racers don’t generally have peanut tanks.

So if that’s a problem that your bike faces as well, this tank might just be the solution. The seller has a number of cafe-related parts up for sale on eBay with this being one of the nicer items. He does mention a dimple in the tank somewhere, but apparently it is small enough that the camera has trouble picking it up. I’m not an expert at mounting custom gas tanks, but there appears to be enough room in the tunnel for a fairly robust frame backbone.

8 hours left in this auction. Good luck!


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1961 Aermacchi 250 Cafe Racer

Here’s a really nicely customized 1961 Aermacchi 250cc bike that has been fully cafe racerized. Cool, one-off details abound. My favorite touches are the widened fuel tank with the fuel gauge placed in the side, and the pretty clean custom rear-sets. Overall, this is a beautiful bike.

From the listing…
Info on bike:

    32mm Ceriani forks
    Flanged rims
    4 leading shoe Grimica front drum brake
    350 Aermacchi rear drum brake with custom drilled cooling holes with stainless mesh installed
    Stainless spokes
    Custom made rear sets
    Custom made stainless steel muffler
    Works Performance rear shocks
    Custom seat with cowl
    Original frame with reinforced section in back by shocks
    Benelli gas tank widened 2 1/2 inches with a custom glass fuel gauge installed and custom vented with billet gas cap
    sealed battery
    12 volt conversion with solid state rectifier and electronic ignition
    custom tach drive
    Original carb
    Complete motor rebuild with hot cam
    Custom made steel fenders
    Custom levers and clip-ons


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BMW R-Series Cafe Racer Seat

For your perusal, a fiberglass cafe racer seat for BMW R-Series models. The bikes pictured below are pretty sweet, an that is a good looking cafe seat on them. These bikes are generally as reliable as can be, and they build up into really nice cafe racers. The bikes can be bought for a reasonable sum, and there are lots of them still around.

The listing claims fitment for 1973-1984 R90/6 and R100/7 models, plus fitment to some other beemers, Hondas, and Yamahas that may require some fiberglass trimming. The price ($155 + $20 shipping) seems mostly reasonable compared to the other offerings out there, and the feedback for these seats has been good. If you have one of these seats on your bike, send me a pic and a description and I’ll post it!


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Cafe Racer Seat for Yamaha SR500 / SR400 or ???

I’ve posted products / bikes by these guys before, but this is the first time I’ve seen this particular item. It is a nice cafe racer seat for a Yamaha SR. Their shop specializes in SR400 and SR500 bikes, but I’d have to guess that this seat would fit on other machines as well. Again, this company is located in Bangkok, the fact of which is not a problem in and of itself, but would make shipping times a bit longer.

Right now the shop doesn’t have any other items posted on eBay, but the polished aluminum tank is something they post fairly regularly. There are also a pair of rear-sets at the bottom of the page that are probably for the SR shown in the pictures. They seem to have a connection with a company in Japan that sells them items with cosmetic blems or fixes, and then they sell it on eBay. Items in the past have included other seats, a complete bike, and gas tanks that have extra welding on the under side (reason unknown, but I would assume a production error leading to a welded in patch).



Yamaha SR500 Cafe Racer Seat

Yamaha SR500 Cafe Racer Seat


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