Archive for the ‘Ducati’ Tag

1975 Ducati 860GT Cafe Racer

Sometimes, an easy litmus test can decide whether something is cool or lame. In the case of this Ducati, just think about riding up to your favorite local hangout. What’s the reaction going to be? Personally, I think this bike would garner looks as being an authentic cafe racer that is no trailer queen. A lot of the Ducatis you might see on Ducati Island at Laguna Seca aren’t going to have this many miles on the clock, nor this much road grime and wear-and-tear. But that’s the whole point, isn’t it?

There isn’t much that hasn’t been done to this bike cafe-wise. It has adjustable clip-ons, shocks, seat, tank, good brakes, and a big-bore kit. What it really needs is (and the seller backs this up) a bit of maintenance come this winter. And maybe a bath and some scrubbing, too.

The price on this bike is still very reasonable at under $2K with less than a day left in the auction (reserve hans’t been met, though). I wish it was on the west coast (it’s in Connecticut), because this may be a chance to get a good deal on a classic bevelhead.

Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 01
Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 02
Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 03
Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 04

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Why are they all Hondas?

I know, I know. This is something of a rhetorical question. But looking back through the posts over the last couple of months, most of the bikes I’ve written about have been from Honda. The CB750, CB550, CB350, and the CB350T have all been featured multiple times in various states of cafe build or disrepair.

I suppose it’s because so many Hondas were sold in the 1970s that they have become the ubiquitous cafe racer starting point in the United States. And so we have lots of aftermarket manufacturers supporting these bikes. Then it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy…

I say bring on the other makes and models of bikes. Let’s see more Suzukis, Yamahas, and Kawasakis! Don’t keep that old Norton in your garage stock! And bring on the Beezers, Triumphs, and other older British marques! And while we’re at it, let’s build more Beemers and Ducks into classic cafe racers!

Sorry for the rant. It’s probably time for my meds…

Ducati 350cc Cafe Racer Project

This bike is not far from being a pretty cool looking little cafe racer. I’m going to say that it is a pair of clip-ons away from being sweet! Nice project that is at a fairly low price with 4 days left in the auction…


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Ducati Monza 250 Cafe Racer

Up for auction right now is this nice conversion of a stock 1968 Ducati Monza 250 into a cafe racer with the simple addition of clubman bars. It has undergone a partial restoration, but is mostly original and includes the stock bars with purchase.

I do have to say that there is something about the bars from an aesthetic standpoint that strikes me as odd. Maybe it is the angle at which they are mounted, or maybe it is the width. Not sure, but I would swap them out for clip-ons if I bought the bike.


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1966 Ducati Monza 250 (Project Bike?)

This bike is cosmetically clean, although some parts are not original. The seller has a very low starting price ($500), but an unknown reserve. And the bike doesn’t currently run.

I think this would make a good starting point for a cafe build, especially because it isn’t necessarily original. There will be less angst when tearing it apart that way. But the Nighthawk shocks might actually be good on there (certainly better than 40 y.o. shocks).

Zero bids so far, and over 6 days left in the auction. It will be interesting to see what this bike ends up selling for…


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Ducati Mk III Cafe Project (in Australia)

I like this bike! I’m drooling right now and making a mess on the keyboard. 😀

I really have no interest in new Ducatis (not that I would turn down a 1098), but old ones really float my boat. I remember watching them when I used to race AHRMA, and thinking that I could make the leap to vintage racing on one of these or an older Diana. Or maybe a Metralla, but that is another story.

I do have to say that the bike is in Australia, which makes it a bit more challenging for a US buyer like myself. But the bike seems to be all there. And if the receipts for work are all in order, it is probably a great bike for the right person.


1970 Ducati Mk III 250cc

Suzuki Bandit 1200 Street Fighter

Okay, okay. I get it. It’s not a cafe racer. Well, guess what? I don’t care.

This bike has some seriously cool kit on it, and I like it for that. Overall, all of these different parts don’t appear kludgey at all.

  • FRONT END DUCATI
  • SWINGARM DUCATI
  • BRAKE BREMBO
  • MARCHESINI WHEELS
  • TAIL MV AGUSTA
  • EXHAUST SYSTEM MV AGUSTA
  • So now the purists out there who hate crazy paint schemes are going bonkers about how ugly the paint is. Sorry. Not everyone has the same taste as you. The paint actually isn’t quite my cup of tea, but the rest of the bike is cool, so I’m not worried about it. Plus, a flat black rattle-can paint job could destroy that $2,500 paint job in about an hour!!! 😉


    Suzuki Bandit 1200 Street Fighter