Archive for the ‘250’ Tag

Idea = Win / Execution = Fail

Here’s a bike into which somebody has put a fair amount of time and effort. It’s a 1975 Honda CL360 that has a Ninja 250 motor stuffed into it. Stuffed is probably the wrong word, as the motor itself appears to fit quite nicely in the frame. Stuffed might apply to a Ninja 500 or 650 motor stuffed into the frame. But I digress…

The idea seen here is kind of unique for the cafe racer scene. Stuff a quarter-liter late-model liquid-cooled engine in a fairly small bike, and then you’ll have a bike that screams like a banshee, but probably isn’t much (if any) faster than the original. In fact, the Ninja motor probably puts out less horsepower and torque than an in-tune CL/CB360/350 motor. But boy would this surprise anyone who happened to hear it scream by. The idea equals a potential win. And another plus: rear-sets!

The execution, however, is a fail. I think this is mainly driven by two things. First off, a simple driveway tip-over is going to crush the hell out of that radiator hung out over the side of the bike. Ouch. Secondly, the muffler. Aesthetics and ground clearance. Enough said…

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1967 Suzuki 250 Hustler Project Bike (No papers and more!!!)

Up on eBay right now is this really eye-catching Suzuki 250 project bike. All was well until I read that it has no papers. And then I read that the motor has no numbers on it. And then I read that the frame is missing numbers, too! If you have a way around this little problem, this is a really nice looking bike that needs a lot of work to be completed.

If you are actually interested in this bike, a couple of highlights are the Triumph twin-leading shoe brake and the new expansion chambers included in the sale. If you couldn’t figure out from the title of this post or the first paragraph, I’m a bit hesitant because of the lack of title-ability of the motorcycle. But maybe the VIN is just hidden under paint and/or powdercoat? Iffy at best…


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Nice Fiberglass Cafe Racer Seat on eBay

I found this nice-looking cafe racer seat on eBay this afternoon. There’s only a couple of hours left though. Hopefully, the seller will repost it again…

Specs: seat is 8 1/2″ wide at front, 9 1/2 wide at hump, 28″ long, seat area is 16″ long


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1961 Aermacchi 250 Cafe Racer (Reposted again (otherwise titled “An Open Letter To Lossa Engineering))

Dear Lossa Engineering,

I believe this is at least the second time this bike has been posted on eBay for sale. I wrote about it before, but apparently that did not help enough as it didn’t sell back in December. Although I no longer work at eBay, I will hazard a guess that your reserve is too high. I once posted about a bike that had an opening price of $100K, but that didn’t work out so well for the seller.

I really appreciate all that you have done to this bike, but perhaps the price is too high for eBay? I’m not sure what it costs to build such an awesome bike as this (Click here to see previous post). However, I am sure it is quite a lot. It is an awesome bike, but I need some new material to blog about. Perhaps you could lower the reserve a bit so that you could fund your next awesome cafe racer build-up. I have posted about two other bikes you have cafe’d, and I really like your style a lot, but there is only so much I can do with relisted bikes. If you would like, I would post a permanent post as a sale listing at the price you really want to get so you can continue providing the world with very cool motorcycles.

As a side note, I have a friend who thinks that you sometimes go overboard with the colored parts (red frames, headlight shells, etc.) on some of the Honda-based bikes you have done. I, however, disagree. Please keep up the good work building cafe racers that are not drenched in flat black. You make the world of motorcycling a little more colorful…

Respectly,

I Love Cafe Racers!!!


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1966 Bultaco Racebike (Cafe Racer Potential)

Up for auction right now on eBay is this supposedly ex-AHRMA race bike that would make a nice street bike if you could get it titled/registered. Plus add a bunch of street stuff to get it through inspection at the DMV. Plus it looks like the footpegs need some work (it’s hard to tell if they’re even there in the photos). Also, please examine photo #4 for yourself. It is hard to tell what’s up with that. Somebody’s been playing with Photoshop too much me thinks. Some kind of weird filter ran over the photo to make it look all artsy. Anyways, nothing really left from the eBay listing other than what I’ve already posted here (word for word below plus all 4 photos). If you are interested it is at $1,500 with 5 bidders and 2 days left…

“”Hi, I’m selling this motorcycle for my brother who’s stationed in Iraq, he used to race it on weekends and tour on bike shows nation wide, this is the description he gives of the bike…

“This is a Bultaco 250cc road racer. The round barrel makes it legal for AHRMA 250 and 350 GP classes among others. The bike was originally a Bultaco Alpina. The motor runs well and the clutch and transmission work great. The motor is stock along with the original Amal 29mm. carb. The body work is a Metralla tank and the seat is of a MV Agusta race seat. The front hub is a Holly 305 Superhawk with an added air scoop for brake cooling. Rims are 18” alloy Akronts. Bike has Betor suspension. The clip-ons are Magura along with the throttle. The bike has been garage kept and is in overall good condition, with few scratches and normal wear and tear. With some new tires and a good “shakedown” it would once again be ready to be a great vintage racer. I do not have a title for it but one can be obtained from http://www.broadwaytitle.com/ if needed”
“”


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Guy builds a cheap cafe racer, and then he dances…

Here’s a little video of a guy building a cheap cafe racer (<$500 supposedly). Stick around for the end. He dances…

27 Minutes and 33 Seconds of your life…

1961 Aermacchi 250 Cafe Racer

Here’s a really nicely customized 1961 Aermacchi 250cc bike that has been fully cafe racerized. Cool, one-off details abound. My favorite touches are the widened fuel tank with the fuel gauge placed in the side, and the pretty clean custom rear-sets. Overall, this is a beautiful bike.

From the listing…
Info on bike:

    32mm Ceriani forks
    Flanged rims
    4 leading shoe Grimica front drum brake
    350 Aermacchi rear drum brake with custom drilled cooling holes with stainless mesh installed
    Stainless spokes
    Custom made rear sets
    Custom made stainless steel muffler
    Works Performance rear shocks
    Custom seat with cowl
    Original frame with reinforced section in back by shocks
    Benelli gas tank widened 2 1/2 inches with a custom glass fuel gauge installed and custom vented with billet gas cap
    sealed battery
    12 volt conversion with solid state rectifier and electronic ignition
    custom tach drive
    Original carb
    Complete motor rebuild with hot cam
    Custom made steel fenders
    Custom levers and clip-ons


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Ducati Monza 250 Cafe Racer

Up for auction right now is this nice conversion of a stock 1968 Ducati Monza 250 into a cafe racer with the simple addition of clubman bars. It has undergone a partial restoration, but is mostly original and includes the stock bars with purchase.

I do have to say that there is something about the bars from an aesthetic standpoint that strikes me as odd. Maybe it is the angle at which they are mounted, or maybe it is the width. Not sure, but I would swap them out for clip-ons if I bought the bike.


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1966 Ducati Monza 250 (Project Bike?)

This bike is cosmetically clean, although some parts are not original. The seller has a very low starting price ($500), but an unknown reserve. And the bike doesn’t currently run.

I think this would make a good starting point for a cafe build, especially because it isn’t necessarily original. There will be less angst when tearing it apart that way. But the Nighthawk shocks might actually be good on there (certainly better than 40 y.o. shocks).

Zero bids so far, and over 6 days left in the auction. It will be interesting to see what this bike ends up selling for…


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That’s a really nice bike, but how much?!?!?

UPDATE: I did a little research, and visited the seller’s website: michaelsmotorcycles.com. The price is just over $3K. Whew!

There are actually a lot of really cool bikes for sale. Check it out…

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This is one of the nicest cafe racers up on eBay right now, but WTF is up with the price? I get trying to use eBay as a lead generation tool. I don’t get putting a $100K price tag on a 1972 Suzuki done up as a cafe racer.

Am I missing something? Can someone please explain? Or at least let me know what the bike is really worth?


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