Archive for October 24th, 2009|Daily archive page

1982 BMW R65LS

If Teutonic styling is more your thing, this is an interesting semi-cafe right from the BMW factory. Straight from Wikipedia, here’s a blurb about the LS model…

In 1982 in an effort to enhance the R65’s image the Hans Muth designed R65LS was introduced. 6,389 R65LS bikes were produced, which featured a triangular shaped pod fairing and instrument housing versus the standard naked front end of the R65. Furthermore a different rear seat featured pillion grab handles similar in style to the soon-to-be-introduced K Series BMWs. Different model transfers were used and the only colours were hennarot (red) and polaris (silver). Much of the chrome work of the R65 was replaced by black painted or black chrome features (exhaust piping, mufflers). Other features included:

    Twin disc front brakes in-lieu of single disc
    Lower front handlebars for a slightly more sporty seating position
    Different alloy wheel pattern – on red models painted white
    Different rear drum brake size
    Black chrome mufflers and black painted exhaust pipes



BMW R65 LS 1982 01
BMW R65 LS 1982 02
BMW R65 LS 1982 03
BMW R65 LS 1982 04
BMW R65 LS 1982 05

1973 Honda CB750 (Stock Bike For Project)

If you are looking for a decent starting point for a cafe racer project, this might be a good bike to begin your work. It’s a 1973 Honda CB750 that is basically stock and in good shape. The seller provided a good list of his recent upgrades to the mechanicals, so I just cut and pasted the list shown below. There are a few more pictures on eBay of some of the details on the bike, but these give you an overall idea of what this bike has in store for you…

I don’t know if this bike is going to sell or not. It has zero bidders with just over a day left in the auction, but the starting price is at $2,500. Buy-It-Now is set at $3,200. If everything works as stated by the seller, this bike appears to be in line with what a decent CB750 is currently worth. I’d love to see pics of this bike after it gets the cafe treatment…


    Had a Honda mechanic replace all the gaskets in the upper half of the engine. Head gasket, valve cover gasket, etc…
    Carbs have been cleaned, rebuilt and synched
    Valves have been timed
    Gas tank has been lined
    New OEM petcock fuel valve
    Clutch has been rebuilt with OEM Honda parts, OEM clutch cable is new also
    Brakes have been serviced and checked out
    Original air box replaced with pod filter, carbs were re-jetted at this time with 120’s, i also have the original air box with a new K&N filter
    Rear fender has been removed and replaced with a fender eliminator kit and LED rear light. Looks great on the bike. Turn signals were flush mounted and look better this way
    New EMGO rear shocks have been added to replace the originals that were pretty useless. I still have them though
    Low (super) bars have been added to give it more of the cafe racer look. Note- these are not “clubman” bars because i found them to be uncomfortable
    Added a headlight visor to front light
    Original chain has been replaced with an o-ring chain
    New battery added last summer
    Original paint on the gas tank (pretty sure side covers are repro)
    I have the original tool kit and original manual from Honda
    I also have 3 additional manuals, including the official Honda service manual which is amazing
    Tires have plenty of tread on them
    Electric ignition and kick start both work great
    All lights, guages and electronics function perfectly


Honda CB750 1973 Cafe Racer Project 01
Honda CB750 1973 Cafe Racer Project 02
Honda CB750 1973 Cafe Racer Project 03
Honda CB750 1973 Cafe Racer Project 04

1975 Ducati 860GT Cafe Racer

Sometimes, an easy litmus test can decide whether something is cool or lame. In the case of this Ducati, just think about riding up to your favorite local hangout. What’s the reaction going to be? Personally, I think this bike would garner looks as being an authentic cafe racer that is no trailer queen. A lot of the Ducatis you might see on Ducati Island at Laguna Seca aren’t going to have this many miles on the clock, nor this much road grime and wear-and-tear. But that’s the whole point, isn’t it?

There isn’t much that hasn’t been done to this bike cafe-wise. It has adjustable clip-ons, shocks, seat, tank, good brakes, and a big-bore kit. What it really needs is (and the seller backs this up) a bit of maintenance come this winter. And maybe a bath and some scrubbing, too.

The price on this bike is still very reasonable at under $2K with less than a day left in the auction (reserve hans’t been met, though). I wish it was on the west coast (it’s in Connecticut), because this may be a chance to get a good deal on a classic bevelhead.

Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 01
Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 02
Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 03
Ducati 860GT 1975 Cafe Racer 04