Archive for the ‘tank’ Tag

2004? Harley Davidson Sportster – Full Cafe!!!

I’m contacting the seller about this bike to try to get more details and more photos. If this is, in fact, a 2004 Sportster, then it is the first full conversion (including tank but minus some cool 18″ wheels) that I’ve seen. A tank like that is exactly what I want to do to my bike. I’ll post updates as I get them.

BTW, the reason I’m not sure about the year is the oil tank. I can’t tell from the photos, but it is either a 2003 tank (non-flush oil filler cap) or it is a 2004 tank with the side cover removed. If anyone has an opinion, please let me know…





1962 Norton Featherbed Cafe Racer

A while back I posted a listing for a Hogbitz Sportster cafe racer that was the most expensive bike to ever hit the blog ($25K asking price). It was relisted at least once, if not multiple times. This Norton comes in a close second with a Buy-It-Now price of $22,500. As is this the second Norton in a row I’ve posted, it is interesting to compare the bikes, and what differentiates an unrestored Norton Commando from a fully restored and cafe-racerized (including lots of motorwork) Norton Featherbed/Manx. I guess the difference comes down to this 1962 Norton being what is essentially a show bike with a hopped-up motor you could ride, versus the 1971 Norton Commando posted before being an unrestored daily rider that has a frame in good shape with “no visible cracks”.

You decide. $22.5K for a beautiful bike that has been gone through with a fine-tooth comb, or $7.5K for a bike that you might put a little elbow grease into over time (and maybe a motor rebuild while you’re at it). It would be interesting to see what this bike sells for, but it is a Buy-It-Now with Make Offer (2 offers so far), so we won’t be able to watch any climbing auction prices.







1978 Suzuki GS750 Cafe Racer


Suzuki GS750 1978 Cafe Racer 0011

I’ve been trying to be nice lately. Really. Haven’t you been able to tell? But I can hold back no longer…

There are three things wrong with this bike. I’ll take the flack if you disagree. First, the seller is unclear on whether or not the bike is a 1978 or a 1979. Maybe that doesn’t matter from a technical standpoint, but it does from a “seller knowing his sh!t” standpoint. Secondly, there is no paperwork to go along with the bike. That can make it difficult to register (especially here on the left coast). Thirdly, the seat. Do I need to spell it out? The TL1000R seat is just wrong. It was iffy on the actual TL1000R, and here it is just not right. The stock seat would be better. A pillow seat would be… well, not better, but not worse.

I get the fact that all of us trying to build cafe-styled bikes makes choices as we design the final look, but this feels more like someone who had an extra TL1000R seat sitting in the garage. That reminds me, I’ve got a TZ250 GP seat in my garage that I just might mount on the ’05 Sportster. I’ll post a pic if I do it. :)

5 days left in the auction, with 4 bidders, and the price at $510. Good luck if you are interested!!!

Suzuki GS750 1978 Cafe Racer 0011
Suzuki GS750 1978 Cafe Racer 0012
Suzuki GS750 1978 Cafe Racer 0013
Suzuki GS750 1978 Cafe Racer 0014
Suzuki GS750 1978 Cafe Racer 0015
Suzuki GS750 1978 Cafe Racer 0016

1972 Suzuki Titan 500 Cafe Racer

I’m not quite sure what to make of this bike. The idea seems good in concept (fully-faired two-stroke cafe racer), but in looking this bike over I’m not sure that it has been executed fully. Stock, it’s a great bike that I would love to own and convert to a cafe. I just think I would keep it more traditional.

Gripe list – square headlight, stock taillight, cafe seat plopped on the rear fender.

Like list – full fairing, two-stroke 500cc engine, fairly reasonable price.

There are zero bidders right now, and the starting price is $2,750 with just over 2 days left in the auction…

Suzuki Titan 500 1972 Cafe Racer 011
Suzuki Titan 500 1972 Cafe Racer 012
Suzuki Titan 500 1972 Cafe Racer 013
Suzuki Titan 500 1972 Cafe Racer 014
Suzuki Titan 500 1972 Cafe Racer 015
Suzuki Titan 500 1972 Cafe Racer 016

1984 BMW R100 Cafe Racer

BMW’s have not been a regular part of this blog as a rule, mostly because not too many of them are converted into cafe racers. However, I’m going to say that this R100 (superbike bars and all) is one of the cleanest, most aesthetically pleasing bikes I’ve posted to date. To be truthful, if it weren’t for the cafe-style seat, this wouldn’t even really be close to a cafe racer.

I’ll get this out of the way first: the Napolean bar-end mirrors should be replaced with something else, or at least mounted under the bars. Other than that, the builder of this bike has really gone all out in creating a beautiful piece of art. Everything looks well done, and it shows as if it just rolled out of the dealer in 1984. And even though the “cafe” conversion is basically just a seat, I’m sure that this R100 would be a blast on a winding road while still being a very comfortable ride.

There’s lots of interest in the bike on eBay. Currently, the price is at $4,250 with 21 bids and over 2 days left in the auction. However, reserve hasn’t been met, and I can’t even guess what the seller might set it at for a bike like this. It will be interesting to see what price the auction ends at…

BMW R100 1984 Cafe Racer 011
BMW R100 1984 Cafe Racer 012
BMW R100 1984 Cafe Racer 013
BMW R100 1984 Cafe Racer 014
BMW R100 1984 Cafe Racer 015
BMW R100 1984 Cafe Racer 016
BMW R100 1984 Cafe Racer 017

1975 Honda CB400 Cafe Racer

This is one of the more modified cafe racers to come up on eBay in a long time. Whether you love or hate the seat, the rest of the bike is built to the hilt. The seller claims the bike “runs super strong”, and from the spec list we have no reason to doubt him. Check out some of the modifications…

    Yoshimura Racing 466cc pistons and rings
    A.P.E. Racing block and ported heads
    Race camshaft
    Titanium valve spring retainers
    Keihin 26mm smooth bore
    Dyna ignition
    Triple clamps from 1979 CBX
    35mm CB550F forks, clear powder coated, 10 wt oil, new seals
    Works Suspension front dual spring kit (#230XH)
    Daytona aluminum front fork brace
    B900F Koni shocks NOS, #7610, 14″ (+1.5″ of std)
    Dual CB550F rotors and calipers, trailing mounted (as opposed to stock forward mounted)
    Baker Precision stainless steel brake lines
    CBR900RR master cylinder and adjustable level
    stretched aluminum tank custom made in England
    Pro Flo 35mm clip-ons
    CBR900RR footpegs and linkages

So what’s the good? Lots of cool modifications that should make this one of the fastest CB400′s around. And what’s the bad? That seat. Oh yeah. The bike ain’t cheap, either. With about a day and a half left in the auction, there are no bidders and the starting price is $3,900. However, there is no reserve, so if there’s one bid, the bike will sell.

Honda CB400 1975 Cafe Racer 011
Honda CB400 1975 Cafe Racer 012
Honda CB400 1975 Cafe Racer 013
Honda CB400 1975 Cafe Racer 014
Honda CB400 1975 Cafe Racer 015

1971 Norton 750 Commando – Gus Kuhn

With about 21 hours left in this eBay auction, here’s a chance to own a classic Gus Kuhn Norton that is fully kitted out. It’s definitely not a show bike, and as the seller claims it starts easily and runs great this would probably be a great bike for Sunday morning runs up to Alice’s Restaurant. That being said, I’m sure this bike would attract a lot of attention if it was parked at any classic bike show.

Here’s a list of parts fitted to the bike

    Racing 850 Kit
    Updated AMAL MK2
    Tomaselli clip-on
    Morris mag wheels
    AP brake master cylinder
    Frame and motor number matching

While reserve hasn’t been met yet, I’d bet that there will be a few more bids before the auction ends. The price currently stands at $3,750 with 8 bids.

Norton 750 Commando Gus Kuhn Cafe Racer 011
Norton 750 Commando Gus Kuhn Cafe Racer 012
Norton 750 Commando Gus Kuhn Cafe Racer 013
Norton 750 Commando Gus Kuhn Cafe Racer 014
Norton 750 Commando Gus Kuhn Cafe Racer 015
Norton 750 Commando Gus Kuhn Cafe Racer 016

1981 Yamaha XS650 Cafe Racer

Here’s a very cool and very built 1981 Yamaha XS650 cafe racer. It’s actually a 750cc due to the big bore pistons that have apparently been dropped into it. Other cool features are the 17″ motard rims wrapped with sticky Michelins. Definitely a little bit different than your usual 18″ wheels. The front brake setup is a mixture of GSXR master cylinder, Ducati 900SS rotor, and old school caliper. Overall, this is a really cool build that mixes old with new and appears to be one stonkin’ cafe racer…

It’s on eBay with 12 hours left, zero bidders, and a starting bid price of $4,500.

Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 021
Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 023
Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 025
Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 026

1981 Yamaha XS650 Cafe Racer

Ignore the angled, artsy photos for a moment, and what you have here is a good starting point to complete a really nice cafe racer. While it has a clear title (lots of eBay bikes don’t), it is missing a few doo-dads that will make it street legal when you try to register it, including the tail light. That being said, this is a beautiful, well executed bike that has a IMHO a very cool paint job. Add an exhaust, some rear-sets and maybe a tach and you’re good to go. Could even more be done to this bike? Yes, but then you wouldn’t be riding it now, would you…

Current price is $1,000 with just under 2 days left in the auction.

Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 01
Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 02
Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 03
Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 04
Yamaha XS650 1981 Cafe Racer 05

1976 Honda CB750 from Lossa Engineering

I’ve posted several Lossa Engineering bikes in the past, and this is probably my least favorite of the ones that have been auctioned off on eBay. Overall, it is a nicely done cafe racer of sorts, but I think the style just isn’t my cup of tea.

Likes: I love all the detail work on the mechanicals. The drilled sprocket cover and shifter are a great touch. The double front discs are well done. The exhaust is unique and cool looking. The street tracker tail section is always nice to see, and I like the dual taillight treatment. And all the powder coating and nickel plating looks really good.

Dislikes: The upside down superbike bars. The paint job (personal taste, ymmv). That funky sprocket cover on the rear wheel. And the Pirelli Scorpion A/T tires (I had them on my KTM :-/ ).

There are lots more pictures and more info on the build and parts on eBay if you’re interested. I doubt this bike is going to meet reserve, though, as there are only 20 hours left and the price is only about $2K at this time. I think if you look at some of the other Lossa bikes that I’ve posted or on their website, you’ll see that this CB750 is a bit different in direction from most of the other bikes to come out of the shop. I’m sure this one will find a home, but it might not be quite as easy as with a more classically-styled builds…

Honda CB750 1976 Lossa Cafe Racer 01
Honda CB750 1976 Lossa Cafe Racer 02
Honda CB750 1976 Lossa Cafe Racer 03
Honda CB750 1976 Lossa Cafe Racer 04
Honda CB750 1976 Lossa Cafe Racer 05
Honda CB750 1976 Lossa Cafe Racer 06

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