Archive for the ‘H-D’ Tag

1977 Harley-Davidson XLCR

Not a lot of info on this bike in the listing. There is what appears to be a low serial number, and the bike doesn’t seem to be too far from stock if at all (unrestored and very clean looking). Low miles, but no good pictures of the VIN. Current bidding has the bike at $8,700 with 11 bids and 14 hours left. However, reserve isn’t met, which means there’s a good chance the bike won’t sell. I’ll repost if it comes back up for sale and maybe we will see what a nice XLCR can sell for in this economy…







1992 Harley-Davidson Sportster Cafe Racer

It’s been a while since I posted a Harley, and this is certainly a pretty well put together cafe racer made out of a Sportster. This has one of the fullest conversions I’ve seen on a US Sporty, and I really like it. I’ve listed below nearly all of the stuff that the seller put in his listing (The bad and the good), so I won’t go on too long about this bike. As with all Sportsters, this bike shows how hard it is to get the seat right. For some reason, these bikes always seem to have such a low seating position that it can’t be good for handling or comfortable to sit on (knees have got to be ablaze after a matter of 30 minutes or so).

Anyways, good luck to anyone who bids on this bike. It seems to be one of the better solid-mount Sportster conversions, and surprisingly, there are no bids yet with two days left. Maybe it is the $3,800 starting price? We’ll see when it ends…
The Bad

    The blinkers are there but not working
    The paint could be freshened up and there is a oil leak
    The starter relay ($10) is out but there is a button on the starter that works well

The Good

    15,500 miles
    Only about 3K on the new 10:1 Wisco 1207 pistons and Andrews N6 cams
    Progressive springs
    Gas Charged adjustable shocks (compression and rebound dampers)
    Daytona Steering damper
    Rockwall clip-ons
    Chainsikle rear sets with a Buell shifter
    Airtech XR750 rear fender
    Custom made seat
    Viper fairing
    7” headlight
    Custom Gas tanks with billet race cap and High flow petcock
    New Dunlop 205 tires front and back (still have the wiskers)
    Thunder Slide kit
    Screamin Eagle ECU
    Crane adjustable push Rods
    Screamin Eagle 2 into 1 pipe, packing removed.
    New High torque Starter
    New chain


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1978 Harley-Davidson XLCR

This is a really clean example of an H-D XLCR. Since you are at this site, I am pretty sure you have heard of it before, but if you haven’t, it was a factory (mostly) cafe racer from Harley-Davidson that was produced only in 1977 and 1978. Under-powered at 61hp compared to it’s contemporary brethren, but with a full helping of somewhat European styling, it was never a sales hit and disappeared from Harley’s bike roster after just over 3,100 machines were produced. It was something of an oxymoronic bike, as current owners of Harley-Davidsons didn’t care for the styling, and speed-freaks could go 20 miles an hour faster on the top-end with a stock CB750.

Be that as it may, the bike for sale here is very, very clean and has been restored to within an inch of its life. Good luck finding a nicer example, unless it is one that was hermetically sealed as it rolled off the factory floor. The auction hasn’t met reserve yet, but there are 6 days left. I’ll post a “How Much Was It Worth?” on the back end…


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2001 Harley-Davidson Sportster Cafe Racer

I am really torn by bikes like this. Converting a Sportster into a cafe racer is kind of a daunting process. There aren’t a lot of sources for true cafe-styled parts for these bike (especially 2004+ rubber-mount bikes), and when you tell the parts guy at your local shop what you are doing, most likely he or she will give you a blank stare.

So if you do manage to find the parts, then you have to do a good job with the conversion. With this particular bike, it is certainly beautiful, and has a number of really nice parts attached to it: Storz rear-sets, nice race-style seat, beautiful H-D themed paint, and a great intake/exhaust combo. But a well-built cafe racer is more than a simple sum of its parts.

In this case, I am concerned that the bike looks lowered front and rear. For my personal Sportster cafe racer, I actually raised the bike 1″ in the front and 2″ in the rear to try for more ground clearance. And I don’t really want to be careening through corners while trying to maintain a grip on the shiny bits at the end of these drag bars. Cafe racers typically have a form-follows-function aesthetic, while this bike is trying to go both ways. Like Storz rear-sets on a lowered bike.

Now, if I could bolt my 15″ shocks to this bike, add my clip-ons, and put some stiff Race-Tech springs in the front end, this would be a great bike…


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There is a big puddle of oil…

…underneath my bike. Arggghhh!!!

I think it is time for a strip-down of the whole thing. I guess this is a sign that the KTM has to be running. There must be some kind of leak from the oil tank. No other reason for oil to be leaking from the rear portion o fthe chassis of which I can think. Wish I had some more money or time. Oh wait! I have time! Now for the money… :(

Clean and Well-Built H-D XLCR

Ahhh. A nice XLCR from Harley-Davidson with many good mods to the motor from the current owner. Maybe my bike will end up being a spiritual successor to the XLCR, but probably never as nice as this one. I like it when people build up bikes in a low-key way, such that it is more about function than form. And it certainly appears that the build was done in a meticulous manner. That would be a nice bike for a fast Sunday morning ride along Mines Rd.


1977 Harley-Davidson XLCR

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